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Wolverine at the Office
 by Tim last post by Tim
Wolverine, Hulk, X-men Alex Ross Cover
 by Tim last post by Tim
X-men Movies How They Should Have Ended Cartoons
 by Tim last post by Tim
Hugh Jackman Wolverine Movie Trailers
 by Tim last post by Tim
X=men Related TV Show on FX - Legion
 by Tim last post by Tim
Wolverine Kill Count
 by Tim last post by Tim
X-men Retro 80's Movie Commercial
 by Tim last post by Tim
X-Men: Apocalypse Final Trailer
 by Tim last post by Tim
X-Men Days of Future Past: The Plane Truth Feature
 by Tim last post by Tim
The World of Wolverine Book - How to Deal with Bullies
 by Tim last post by Tim
X-men Facts

The X-Men are a team of mutant superheroes in the Marvel Comics Universe. They were created by writer Stan Lee and artist Jack Kirby, and first appeared in The X-Men #1 (September 1963).

The X-Men comics have been adapted into other media, including an animated television series, video games, and a commercially successful series of films starring Hugh Jackman as Wolverine and Patrick Stewart as Professor X.

The biggest villains the X-men face are Magneto,  Brotherhood of Mutants, Sentinels, Apocalypse, Mister Sinister, the Marauders, the Acolytes, the U-Men, and the Purifiers.

In early 1963, with the success of Spider-Man in Amazing Fantasy, as well as the Hulk, Thor, Iron Man, and the Fantastic Four, creator Stan Lee devised the series title after Marvel publisher Martin Goodman turned down the initial name, "The Mutants", stating that readers would not know what a "mutant" was.

The title lagged in sales behind Marvel's other comic franchises. In 1969, writer Roy Thomas and illustrator Neal Adams rejuvenated the comic book and gave regular roles to two recently introduced characters: Havok/Alex Summers (who had been introduced by Roy Thomas before Adams began work on the comic) and Lorna Dane, later called Polaris (created by Arnold Drake and Jim Steranko). However, these later X-Men issues failed to attract sales and Marvel stopped producing new stories with issue #66, later reprinting a number of the older comics as issues #67–93. It wasn't until Giant-Size X-Men #1  came out in 1975 that the X-men really took off.

 Writer Len Wein and artist Dave Cockrum introduced a new team that then starred in a revival of The X-Men, beginning with issue #94. This new team, however, differed greatly from the original. Unlike in the early issues of the original series, the new team was not made up of teenagers and they also had a more diverse background. Each was from a different country with varying cultural and philosophical beliefs, and all were already well-versed in using their mutant powers, several being experienced in combat. The "all-new, all-different X-Men" were led by Cyclops from the original team and consisted of the newly created Colossus (from the Soviet Union), Nightcrawler (from West Germany), Storm (from Kenya), and Thunderbird (a Native American from the Apache nation), along with three previously introduced characters, Banshee (from Ireland), Sunfire (from Japan), and Wolverine (from Canada), who eventually became the breakout character on the team and, in terms of comic sales and appearances, the most popular X-Men character. A revamped Jean Grey soon rejoined the X-Men as the popular Phoenix; Angel, Beast, Havok, and Polaris also made significant guest appearances.

By the early 1980s, X-Men was Marvel's top-selling comic title. Its sales were such that distributors and retailers began using an "X-Men index", rating each comic book publication by how many orders it garnered compared to that month's issue of X-Men.

Although this was not initially the case, Professor X has come to be compared to civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. and Magneto to the more militant Malcolm X. The X-Men’s purpose is sometimes referred to as achieving "Xavier’s dream," perhaps a reference to King’s historic "I Have a Dream" speech. (Magneto, in the first film, quotes Malcolm X with the line "By any means necessary.") X-Men comic books have often portrayed mutants as victims of mob violence, evoking images of the lynching of African Americans in the age before the American civil rights movement. Sentinels and anti-mutant hate groups such as Friends of Humanity, Humanity's Last Stand, the Church of Humanity and Stryker's Purifiers are thought to often represent oppressive forces like the Ku Klux Klan giving a form to denial of civil rights and amendments. In the 1980s, the comic featured a plot involving the fictional island nation of Genosha, where mutants are segregated and enslaved by an apartheid state. This is widely interpreted as a reference to the situation in South Africa at the time.